UNSW Built Environment: Utzon Lecture Series ‘Vertical Density’

14 06 2011

The next instalment of the 2011 UNSW Built Environment Utzon Lecture Series is being held tomorrow (Wednesday) night. The lecture is titled “Vertical Density” and will be given by Carol Willis, Adjunct Associate Professor of Urban Studies at Columbia University and Director, The Skyscraper Museum, New York City.

Date: Wednesday 15 June, 2011

Refreshments: 6.15pm – 6.45pm Red Centre, West Wing, Gallery

Lecture: 7.00pm – 8.00pm

Venue: Keith Burrows Lecture Theatre, UNSW Kensington Campus

Cost: Free

Download a UNSW campus map here.

The lecture will explore the different ways to conceptualize urban density: in the ground plane and in the skyline. The world’s densest major cities are Hong Kong, Mumbai, and Dhaka which are wildly disparate models of urban development in the vertical and horizontal dimensions. New York’s density concentrates in Manhattan, where residents number 71,000 per square mile. Using the historical model of New York City and its high-rise zoning regulation, the talk will examine how development pressures, public policy, and urban cultures shape buildings and cities. Further, the talk will consider the correlations of density with affluence–as in Manhattan and Hong Kong–and with poverty. Preferring the density of affluence, the talk asks: Is vertical density a product of rampant capitalist markets, of particular cultures, or can it be planned? Is it a positive goal for cities old and new?

Please register for the event between 6.15 and 6.45 tomorrow night.

 

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